Format:
Book
Author:
Title:
Edition:
First edition.
Publisher, Date:
New York : Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2010.
©2010
Description:
295 pages ; 19 cm.
Summary:
Considered by many to be mentally retarded, a brilliant, impatient fifth-grader with cerebral palsy discovers a technological device that will allow her to speak for the first time.
Target Audience Note:
Lexile: 700.
10 up.
Ages 10 up.
Subjects:
Notes:
"A novel"--Jacket.
Georgia children's book award nominee 2011-2012.
LCCN:
2009018404
ISBN:
9781416971702
141697170X
Other Number:
401713291
System Availability:
13
Current Holds:
0
# Local items:
13
Control Number:
160487
Call Number:
J DRAPER
Course Reserves:
0
# Local items in:
7
# System items in:
7
Is it on the shelf?
Large Cover Image
Trade Reviews

Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* Fifth-grader Melody has cerebral palsy, a condition that affects her body but not her mind. Although she is unable to walk, talk, or feed or care for herself, she can read, think, and feel. A brilliant person is trapped inside her body, determined to make her mark in the world in spite of her physical limitations. Draper knows of what she writes; her daughter, Wendy, has cerebral palsy, too. And although Melody is not Wendy, the authenticity of the story is obvious. Told in Melody's voice, this highly readable, compelling novel quickly establishes her determination and intelligence and the almost insurmountable challenges she faces. It also reveals her parents' and caretakers' courage in insisting that Melody be treated as the smart, perceptive child she is, and their perceptiveness in understanding how to help her, encourage her, and discourage self-pity from others. Thoughtless teachers, cruel classmates, Melody's unattractive clothes ("Mom seemed to be choosing them by how easy they'd be to get on me"), and bathroom issues threaten her spirit, yet the brave Melody shines through. Uplifting and upsetting, this is a book that defies age categorization, an easy enough read for upper-elementary students yet also a story that will enlighten and resonate with teens and adults. Similar to yet the antithesis of Terry Trueman's Stuck in Neutral (2000), this moving novel will make activists of us all. Copyright 2010 Booklist Reviews.

Publishers Weekly Reviews

Melody Brooks, in a wheelchair and unable to speak, narrates this story about finding her voice. The first half of the book catalogues Melody's struggles—from her frustration with learning the same preschool lessons year after year to her inability to express a craving for a Big Mac. Draper, whose daughter has cerebral palsy, writes with authority, and the rage behind Melody's narrative is perfectly illustrated in scenes demonstrating the startling ignorance of many professionals (a doctor diagnoses Melody as "profoundly retarded"), teachers, and classmates. The lack of tension in the plot is resolved halfway through when Melody, at age 10, receives a talking computer, allowing her to "speak." Only those with hearts of stone won't blubber when Melody tells her parents "I love you" for the first time. Melody's off-the-charts smarts are revealed when she tests onto her school's quiz bowl team, and the story shifts to something closer to The View from Saturday than Stuck in Neutral. A horrific event at the end nearly plunges the story into melodrama and steers the spotlight away from Melody's determination, which otherwise drives the story. Ages 10–up. (Mar.)

[Page 132]. Copyright 2010 Reed Business Information.

Book
2010

Add to My List  
Bestsellers On Order  
New York Times Bestsellers  
Books on CD  
DVDs  
Graphic Novels  
Music CDs  
Paperback Books  
Reader's Corner- Kids & Teens  
Reader's Corner - Adults  
World Languages